Too Far Gone - Extras - Marliss Melton

Too Far Gone – Extras

Casting the Characters

Readers have asked me what I think my characters look like. They’ve also asked what actors and actresses would play the characters in my books, so I decided to add this page to my website to satisfy my readers’ curiosity. I’m sure that your mental image of my characters is quite different than mine (in fact, these movie stars merely resemble my own mental images of my characters.)

Michael Rosembaum

Chief Sean Mitchell Harlan, aka “Harley”  

Now THIS is Sean. I have found him at last, forcing Jason Stratham to retire the honor. He was too old to play Sean, anyway.

This is Michael Rosenbaum, a relative newcomer in Hollywood, who most recently played Lex Luthor in the television series "Smallville”. Though he has acted and directed many films, many of them appear to have been produced overseas. While Michael has garnered lots of media attention recently for playing such a brilliant villain, I think he needs to be cast as a hero, specifically as Sean. He isn’t naturally bald, but then neither is Sean. He’s got the same light eyes, the same fair coloring, and he’s younger than Jason Stratham which gives him the edge. Congratulations, Michael, you’ve got yourself a great role to play!

Julianne Hough

Eleanor McKenzie Stuart, aka “Ellie”  

A reader named Gayle discovered this wonderful look-alike for Ellie. Julian Hough is fairly new on the Hollywood scene. She is a dancer on “Dancing with the Stars” and an up-and-coming country singer. We like her for her innocent, country-girl look. I’m sure she can fight her own battles, though, as Ellie is so determined to do.

Myers-Briggs Personality Types

Learn more about your favorite characters:   

Here are the Myers-Briggs Personality Types of my lead characters. I use the Myers Briggs Typology Inventory to help me define my characters, so that they come alive! To discover your own personality type, take the free personality test here.

Hero: Sean “Harley” Harlan (“The Doer”)

Personality Page writes, “ESTPs are outgoing, straight-shooting types. Enthusiastic and excitable, ESTPs are doers who live in the world of action. Blunt, straight-forward risk-takers, they are willing to plunge right into things and get their hands dirty. They live in the here-and-now, and place little importance on introspection or theory. ESTPs have an uncanny ability to perceive people’s attitudes and motivations. They pick up on little cues which go completely unnoticed by most other types, such as facial expressions and stance. They’re typically a couple of steps ahead of the person they’re interacting with. ESTP has decided that something needs to be done, then their do it and get on with it attitude takes precedence over the rules. However, the ESTP tends to have their own strong belief in what’s right and what’s wrong. They love to have fun, and are fun people to be around. ESTPs have a natural abundance of energy and enthusiasm, which makes them natural entrepreneurs. They get very excited about things, and have the ability to motivate others to excitement and action.” The military relies heavily on ESTPs because they are one of the few personality types who are “natural born killers.” This is why Sean can be so wonderful and charming and yet be a sniper who shoots the enemy without remorse.”

Heroine: Ellie Stuart-The ISTJ “Duty Fulfiller”

The personality page writes, “ISTJs have a strongly-felt internal sense of duty, which lends them a serious air and the motivation to follow through on tasks. ISTJs are very loyal, faithful, and dependable. They place great importance on honesty and integrity. They are good citizens who can be depended on to do the right thing for their families and communities. ISTJs tend to believe in laws and traditions, and expect the same from others. They’re not comfortable with breaking laws or going against the rules. (Note that Sean’s personality type doesn’t mind breaking laws). The ISTJ often works long hours, and may be unwittingly taken advantage of” by others who don’t work as hard. When Ellie was married to her slacker-husband Carl, she had to do practically everything. “ISTJs are likely to be uncomfortable expressing affection and emotion to others. Traditional and family-minded, they will put forth great amounts of effort at making their homes and families running smoothly. They are responsible parents…good and generous providers to their families. They care deeply about those close to them, although they usually are not comfortable with expressing their love.” We see this at the end of the story, where Ellie is torn between her feelings and her strong independence. “The ISTJ is likely to express their affection through actions, rather than through words.” What is interesting about ISTJs is that, under stress, they “may fall into catastrophe mode, where they see nothing but all of the possibilities of what could go wrong. They will berate themselves for things which they should have done differently. They will lose their ability to see things calmly and reasonably, and will depress themselves with their visions of doom.” This is undoubtedly what happens to Ellie when she thinks her boy will be lost to her forever. Thank God for Sean, who rouses her from her depression with the promise of taking action.

Sean and Ellie as Mirror Partners

When an ESTP and an ISTJ fall in love, this relation is called Mirror pairing. Mirror partners have similar interests and ideas, but a slightly different understanding of the same problems. Each partner can see only half of one problem. Therefore the partners always find what the other partner is thinking interesting. As both Ellie and Sean as concrete thinkers, they are very like-minded. However, what Sean may consider solid and final appears incomplete and changeable for Ellie, and vice versa. This is a situation that will occur over and over for them, causing hot disputes. However, Mirror partners are often very good friends. When they work together on the same project, their mutual correction and adjustment becomes a constructive criticism that is usually accepted as useful. They will, of course, struggle over future goals, as the P in Sean’s ESTP personality type makes him want to keep plans open ended and the J in Ellie’s ISTJ makes her want to stick to timelines.

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